Ripple CEO Brad Garlinghouse speaks onstage during Day 1 of TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2018
Ripple CEO Brad Garlinghouse speaks onstage during Day 1 of TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2018 at Moscone Center on September 5, 2018 in San Francisco, California. Steve Jennings/Getty Images for TechCrunch

San Francisco-based blockchain firm Ripple has filed for yet another trademark with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) last week.

Filed last Friday, the application is classified under the “Advertising and Business” and “Insurance and Financial” categories, and is for the trademark “PayString”. It remains unknown which business or product will be under the PayString name, as there is little information to go by. In fact, the trademark registration description is very similar to that used for the “Ripplenet” filing from earlier this year. The use cases in the filing are:

“Electronic financial services, namely monetary services for receiving and disbursing remittances and monetary gifts in fiat currencies and virtual currencies over a computer network and for exchanging fiat currencies and virtual currencies over a computer network.”

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This year Ripple has filed a number of trademark applications. Back in August, the firm applied for a batch of three trademarks, for Ripple Impact, Ripple X, and Ripplex, all three of which referred to electronic payment services and monetary gifts in fiat currencies. Overall, Ripple has applied for 11 trademarks throughout 2020, according to the USPTO website.

While the firm is actively applying for trademarks in the U.S., it remains unknown if it will remain based in the country. Last month, a senior executive at Ripple warned that the firm could soon move to either Singapore or the U.K. if the U.S. does not change its regulatory stance on crypto. The executive further stated that almost every other country had a better regulatory climate for crypto than the U.S..

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